20 April to 9 May

“O”

William Arnold: Tin-can Firmament photographic series & work-in-progress microphotographs

Melanie King: Photographs of celestial objects

Myka Baum: Worm tracings and sculpture of worm castings bronze on scales

Reception: Friday April 21, 17.00 to 19.00 (more information)

The theme of the circle is depicted in William Arnold’s Tin-can Firmaments through the circular shaped image that is the nature of the tin-can pinhole camera. The photographs are the result of months-long exposure of the sky and function at both macro and micro level. They reference some grounding or basis in the scientific method that builds and organises knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions of forms in the universe, yet originate from a largely emotionally driven catalyst; rather than depicting events they represent the conditions of light and time in which events took place. A new body of micro-photographs intend to add a further dimension to the work.

At the core of Melanie King’s practice are celestial bodies which form both the subject as well as the cause of her work. Recent photogravures of our planet earth and moon are shown alongside night sky cyanotypes. Melanie is concerned with the visual language that is currently associated with astronomy. Her practice maintains an ongoing obsession with circularity from the micro to the macro scale, focusing on the emblem of the bubble as metaphor for the brevity of life.

Myka Baum’s practice is concerned with the fragility of nature. Her Worm Tracings are the starting points of an in-depth study of earthworms which intends to re-think our relationship with this vital yet overlooked species. The images are records of the worms’ passage within the circularity that is representational of our earth and is also characteristic of the action of worms. The delicate traces echo their vulnerability caused by man. The earthworm is an exemplary advocate for a circular economy and key contributor to our planetary wellbeing which will be depicted via a bronze of its castings on a set of scales.

 


 

Myka Baum is a London based visual artist concerned with the fragility of nature, working with mixed photographic processes, natural phenomena and installation. After a decade in Logistics Management Myka escaped from the office to study for a BA in Fashion Product Management (2004) where she discovered art and became a keen photographer. She went on to study on the Postgraduate Certificate in Photography at Central Saint Martins (2009) which resulted in her Lunar Mare series being selected for Bloomberg New Contemporaries 09. Baum has exhibited at Café Park Gallery, Brighton Photo Fringe, Photofusion, Cornerhouse, and APT gallery amongst others and is currently in her second year of postgraduate study at the Royal College of Art on the Print pathway.

She says:

My practice is concerned with the fragility of nature and how we have become so disconnected from both nature and our animal being. My work is largely informed by my deep engagement with and close observation of nature, ’feeling my way intellectually into the inner heart of a thing to locate what is unique and inexpressible in it’ (Henri Bergson) and attempting to make this visible through my work. An ongoing investigation into the point at which nature becomes an image is centred on a microbiology of growing and rotting matter, which becomes implicated onto the surface of the image. The worm trace series show records of their passage within the circularity that is representational of our earth and is also characteristic of the action of worms. The delicate traces echo their vulnerability caused by man.

Myka Baum: Worm Action / Eating And Shitting

 

William Arnold (b.1983) is a visual artist and historian whose work crosses photographic genres of documentary and fine art.

Inspired by the early experiments of the first photographic pioneers, William works most often in series of photographs that seek to explore aspects of temporality, the physical qualities of light and the role played by process in current debates surrounding the materiality of photography and the perceived authority of the photograph as historical or scientific document.

William takes a playful approach to the documentary form, while applying some of its rigours to make works that purport to have some grounding or basis in the scientific method of knowledge building – testable explanations and predictions of forms in the universe, yet are produced largely of an emotionally driven catalyst.

Living and working in west Cornwall, UK, William is interested in the layers of history, human and natural that comprise the making of ‘the land’ – this includes the built environment indoors and out. He is interested in the role played by the photographic surface both literally and metaphorically in recording, interrogating and representing these histories.

Of this work, he says:

Tin-can Firmament is a series of months-long exposure pinhole photographs of the sky presented – in an appropriation of the language of a classic photographic expedition – as a series of semi-fictional astronomical observations. The work plays on the problems of indexicality and the position as both art and science that the photographic medium has held since its inception.

The environment has a hand in the creation of the photographs, as the pinhole camera tins fill with water and rust, lifting the emulsion in places, causing the pock-marks, swirls and strange refractions of light in the final works that are redolent of and come to represent the celestial bodies.

William Arnold: Tin-can Firmament: North 50° 37’ 22′′, West 04° 64′ 34′′

 

 

Melanie King‘s practice has maintained an obsession with circularity from the micro to the macro scale. During her MA in Art and Science, Melanie’s research focused on the emblem of the bubble as a metaphor for the brevity of life. Melanie likened 17th Century Dutch Vanitas paintings to artists working with bubbles in modern and contemporary art, and considered the idea the the universe is just one bubble amongst a see of cosmic foam (multiverse theory). Melanie also participated in a residency at the MRC Anatomical Neuropharmacology Unit, looking for bubble shaped cells within the brain of a rat.

Melanie is the co-director of the London Alternative Photography Collective, which promotes the use of analogue photography in contemporary art. Melanie is also the co-director of super/collider and lumen studios, both of which are focused on exploring themes of astronomy, science and nature through artistic practice. Melanie is currently studying towards a PhD in Fine Art at the Royal College of Art.

She says:

At the core of my practice are celestial bodies which form both the subject as well as the cause of her work. Recent photogravures of our planet earth and moon are shown alongside night sky cyanotypes. I am concerned with the visual language that is currently associated with astronomy. Her practice maintains an ongoing obsession with circularity from the micro to the macro scale, focusing on the emblem of the bubble as metaphor for the brevity of life.

Melanie King: Moon Photogravure

 11 to 30 May

exhibition of work by Lori Hepner and by Minou Polleros & Rosalind Holgate Smith

Lori Hepner says

My artistic practice explores the relationship between physical experiences, visual memory, and machine/technological vision and how they can cross pollinate each other in unexpected ways. Experiences in Northern and Arctic landscapes have been a focus of mine for the past 4 years, where I have spent expanded periods of time during non-traditional, exploratory artist residencies where we hiked and canoed with other artists to explore the outdoors. Kilpisjärvi and Korpo Island, Finland; Ísafjörður, Iceland, the Yukon Territory, Canada; and the island of Svalbard, Norway have been some of these landscapes.

My challenge has been to translate my experiences on these trips by re-preforming my movements across those landscapes in my studio using LEDs that allow me to load in my photographs of these places. Through long exposure photography, self-created LED imaging devices, and most recently, real-time computer vision projections, my movements re-perform the landscapes contained in new spaces for new audiences.

Lori Hepner – 5 Islands

How to find us

Find your way to Dartington Hall

Park in the main car park (there is a small charge). Then walk DOWN the hill until you see the large blue sign for SPACE. Walk towards the buildings at the end and find us upstairs. There are signs in main reception directing you to the gallery.

If you have a blue badge, there are three parking bays available outside SPACE. They are quite often in use, so if you’d like us to reserve one for you please ring us on 07968 208583, or email us.  Although the gallery is on the first floor, the building is fully wheelchair accessible.